The Phantom Of The Opera with Live Score by Minima

Minima specialise in live accompaniment to silent films. Their electrifying new score for The Phantom Of The Opera captures the horror of the story but also finds pathos, romance and humour. Drums, bass, guitar and cello strike up a thrilling relationship with the film, following the Phantom down into his subterranean nightmare world.

Press quotes from the film’s original 1925 release contest to its impact and drama: “Ultra fantastic melodrama” (New York Times); “Produced on a stupendous scale” (Moving Picture World); “Probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened” (Variety).

Beneath the sewers of the Paris Opera House dwells a masked figure. He is the Phantom, a hideously disfigured composer whose dream is to turn chorus singer Christine into a diva. Lon Chaney, the “Man of a Thousand Faces”, dominates this classic adaptation of the 1910 novel. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this one of the great classics of American silent film.

Film critic Roger Ebert said in 2004 that “it has always been a question whether The Phantom Of The Opera is a great film, or only a great spectacle.” Either way, to see this film in 1925 was a truly shocking experience. Fast-moving and exciting, the film is a dramatic tale of obsession, kidnap, murder and revenge, beautifully tinted throughout and featuring an impressive sequence of early Technicolor as the Phantom appears at a masked ball.

“Minima are one of the leading bands accompanying silent film in Europe.”
Robert Rider, Head of Cinema, the Barbican Centre

“Minima’s spine-tingling music clung to each twist of the movie… spellbinding accompaniment.”
Guardian

“A superbly sinister live score by the soundtrack group Minima.”
Financial Times

Bristol Bad Film Club

At Bristol Bad Film Club we believe that great movies fall into two categories: they either have to be the very best… or the very worst. Whether they are Citizen Kane or Plan 9 From Outer Space, we believe that at the very least, a movie should entertain… and there is something wonderful about a truly ‘bad film’.

Whether it’s the head-scratching dialogue, the shoddy special effects or acting that would not look out of place in a nursery school’s nativity play. Instead of ignoring these films and condemning them, Bristol Bad Film Club is dedicated to showing them, and other cult films of their ilk, in all their terrible glory, and basking in their awfulness.

124532_front

Zone Troopers

In Italy during World War II, an American military patrol discovers a spaceship that has crash-landed in the woods, along with its alien crew. A nearby Nazi unit also sends a patrol to investigate the crash and to capture the aliens if possible.

“We all love good movies, but a true cinephile is someone who totally digs talking about the worst movies they’ve seen.”
Pauline Kael, Film Critic